Academy Blog

Central Banks vs Trump, Who's Agenda Will Win?

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 5, 2017 8:45:58 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Central Banks, central bank debt, Trump, Trumponomics

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agen∙da: an underlying often ideological plan or program

I want to continue to build on the theme over the last several blogs with regard to understanding what’s going on in the bond market in relation to the stock market. The stock market is the tuxedo wearing, glamor star who upon walking in the room causes everyone’s head to turn. It did again this week…more records on the Dow, S&P 500 and NASDAQ.

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Trump Vs. Reagan, the TWO Causes of Inflation with No Growth

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 12, 2016 11:33:57 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Inflation, Bond Markets, Trump, Reagan, central bank debt

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The big differences between Trump and Reagan’s inherited economies

Just after the Trump election I wrote that the stock market would get some wind in its sails purely on the enthusiasm of Trumpulus (stimulus generated by Trump intending on building things), and we’ve certainly seen that happen.  So much so, that we need to take a little breath and recognize the expensiveness of stocks at this level, and take a sobering look at the economy Trump is inheriting versus what things were like when Ronald Reagan took office in 1982.

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T.R.E.N.D. - "D" stands for the DEBT central banks have burdened us all with

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 4, 2016 2:33:33 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Negative Interest Rates, Non-traditional investing, Market Trends, Stock Market Volatility, debt, central bank debt

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Micro issues can drive markets in the short term, but longer, more established trends are affected by macro issues.  And there is no macro issue more significant in our worldwide economic system than the amount of debt being carried by countries, banks, corporations and individuals.  The numbers are so large that it's difficult to wrap our brain around them.  It will have to be addressed and the central banks will do so either by reacting to the next crisis like a Shearson bankruptcy, or they will create a flash point to usher in a what they believe will be a solution.

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