Academy Blog

T.R.E.N.D. - "D" stands for the DEBT central banks have burdened us all with

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 4, 2016 2:33:33 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Negative Interest Rates, Non-traditional investing, Market Trends, Stock Market Volatility, debt, central bank debt

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Micro issues can drive markets in the short term, but longer, more established trends are affected by macro issues.  And there is no macro issue more significant in our worldwide economic system than the amount of debt being carried by countries, banks, corporations and individuals.  The numbers are so large that it's difficult to wrap our brain around them.  It will have to be addressed and the central banks will do so either by reacting to the next crisis like a Shearson bankruptcy, or they will create a flash point to usher in a what they believe will be a solution.

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T.R.E.N.D. - N is for Negative Interest Rates as dictated by Central Banks

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 28, 2016 5:00:00 AM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Negative Interest Rates, Non-traditional investing, Market Trends, Stock Market Volatility

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In my blog from July 12th, we revisited the Wall of Doom, where I originally forecast in November 2015 that though incredibly volatile, the market would move higher.  That’s been the case and we’ve set new records in every index.  I know records are fun, but let’s not get carried away with the notion that investors are making a killing just because we’ve posted a new peak.

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Negative Interest Rates and their effect on the World Economy

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 25, 2016 10:49:48 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Negative Interest Rates, Non-traditional investing

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The second week of February 2016 saw the bottom of the worst start of a year in stock market history, when the S&P 500 shed nearly 12% of its value.  That same week I started a 9-part video series on negative interest rates (see below), because with the stock markets selling off so significantly, central banks were pulling out their defibrillators and yelling “Clear!”.  Their latest strategy of quantitative easing was to implement negative interest rates, which if you think about it, was a natural extension since rates across the globe were near zero.

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Things not going as planned for the Bank of Japan

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 22, 2016 2:43:48 PM / by Robert Brinkman posted in Advanced Investing, Bank of Japan, Negative Interest Rates

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WHAT ARE PRIMARY DEALERS?

When a central bank wants to print money, it buys government bonds from the primary dealers and pays for those bonds with money from thin air. Every major bond market in the world has a system of “primary dealers.”

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